Legal Recruitment from Ten-Percent Legal

Wednesday, December 08, 2021

Legal Recruitment News December 2021

Welcome to the December 2021 edition of Legal Recruitment News. It includes our legal job market report, locum hourly rates, advice on DIY legal recruitment, changing locum hours mid-assignment, making sure you are not the asset in a law firm sale, careers advice and suggested interview answers.

http://www.legal-recruitment.co.uk/legal-recruitment-news-december-2021/

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Licensed Conveyancers, Legal Cashiers, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database.

Legal Job Market Report December 2021

Here is our summary of the current state of the legal job market:


Locum Recruitment - Busy
The locum market still remains busy for this time of year than ever before, with a 100% increase in the number of assignments last month compared with the same time last year. We are starting to see availability for just about every assignment coming our way which remains a huge improvement on the summer season.



Conveyancing locums are available in most areas now. Other fields of law are generally not too bad at all, although family locums are a little scarce at the moment. Most corporate and commercial areas still attract a lot of interest, whether in private practice or in house.



Locum assignment updates here: https://www.interimlawyers.co.uk/category/locum-solicitor-updates/



Permanent Recruitment - Busy
There remains a shortage of good candidates for most jobs and we are now into the traditional dip in the market prior to the Christmas break. Most people have better things to do than apply for new jobs and usually the market drops completely until mid-January, which is good news for recruiters with Christmas shopping to do! However as most job interviews are still being undertaken via Zoom and Teams we anticipate interviews taking place right up until Christmas Eve, which does not usually happen. The decrease in new lawyers registering with us remains acute - we are 100% down this month again in new candidate registrations.



Vacancies can be viewed here: https://www.ten-percent.co.uk/vacancies/



Law Firms for Sale - Busy
Quieter this month than last, but a new national client seeking to purchase a number of firms quickly has pushed our workload up a bit from the usual dip in our workloads. There has been a noticeable change in potential values of firms downwards, courtesy we think of the hostile PII market in recent months.



Full list at https://www.jonathanfagan.co.uk/law-accountancy-firms-for-sale/. For a confidential discussion about a potential sale or purchase please ring 01824 780937 and speak to Jonathan Fagan or email jbfagan@ten-percent.co.uk.



Ten Percent Legal Recruitment Statistics



General Statistics for November 2021 (bracketed number is for November 2020)
New permanent vacancies added: 46 (25)
New locum vacancies added: 50 (20)
New candidates registering: 34 (88)



IHS Markit / CIPS UK Services PMI Report December 2021



Headlines
New business growth hits five-month high despite surging price inflation
Strongest increase in new work since June
Output growth eases slightly from October's three-month high
Input costs and prices charged rise at record rates in November



Summary:



A strong recovery in UK service sector activity continued during November, helped by the fastest rise in new business intakes for five months. Export sales were a key factor supporting growth across the service economy in November, with looser travel restrictions contributing to the steepest upturn in new business from abroad since March 2017. The latest survey data highlighted another round of rapid cost inflation, driven by higher fuel prices, wages and utility bills. Prices charged by service providers also increased at the fastest rate since the survey began in July 1996.


https://www.ten-percent.co.uk/legal-job-market-report-december-2021/

Law Firm Sales - making sure you are not the asset for sale


A recent law firm sale process has got us thinking about an issue that comes up quite regularly when it comes to selling a law firm, which is that very often a lot of the business coming into a firm for sale is flowing through and sourced by the person selling the practice.



A practice might have a senior partner, two or three consultants, junior fee earners and support staff. The owner will probably do the vast majority of the work but also it is likely he/she will also be the person who doesn’t want to carry on working once the sale has gone through. Sellers tend to expect a lump sum to be paid for the practice upfront and for themselves to leave and stop working within a period of a maximum of six to nine months.



Buyers on the other hand instantly see things differently. Feedback after some initial meetings can be that as far as they can see all the value is in the seller and there is very little else up for sale. The buyer cannot understand why a £400,000 turnover practice is for sale with a cash price of £200,000 if the main creator of all the work is going to be leaving the business within six months. As such, they can’t see any value and the most they can think of offering will be somewhere around the £25,000 to £30,000 mark.



This has happened a few times over the last couple of months and it is a common issue right across all kinds of business sale in all sectors. Countless business books have been written about the issue - planning for the future and extracting yourself from a business with maximum benefit. The main piece of advice is always that you should avoid making yourself the asset that is going to be up for sale.



Hire a Manager



This is easier said than done. I run businesses and I know how hard it is to recruit to take over my work so I can concentrate on other things, because I know as soon as I hand over part of the business that particular area will find the income dropping. I have the possibly inaccurate perception that someone else is not going to generate as much work as I do. It means that one day when I don’t need to work anymore and want to sell up, the value of my business is going to be lower than if I recruit staff who do that work and I simply manage the teams.



There are so many law firms right across the country where this is just not contemplated, for whatever reason, and lawyers carry on working without looking to take on other fee earners until they’re in their 70s and then seek to release equity from their practice even though they haven’t got a team to run the work if they retire.



Walk Away



This of course is all absolutely fine if your plan is simply to use the business to generate work and then when you want to stop you simply close down the business, pay the run off cover and walk away. No problem at all. However, if you want to sell your business and walk away with a lump sum from it, or you want someone else to pay the run off cover because it’s a huge amount of money, then you are going to need to think about this issue very carefully.



Step Away from Fee Earning



Do you really need to be doing the fee earning work or would it be better to simply find someone else to do that for you, and for you to concentrate on managing your business and growing it further? If you source a fee earner to do your work would you be free to spend more time generating new income streams?



Pros and Cons



Weigh up the pros and cons – the pros of doing it yourself are that if you do the work your business makes more money, you have no stress over paying staff, you don’t have to manage or supervise someone else doing your work, you know the work is going to get done properly. Cons – your business will be worth less when you sell it, you will not have any time to generate any more work but simply spend most of your time dealing with work you already have, your company will never grow substantially, your business will simply stay the same size.



Feeling Lucky?



I guess it all boils down to whether or not you are someone who likes to take risks. If you take a risk and employ someone to do certain types of work, if it doesn’t work out you can always let them go. If you don’t like taking risks then aiming at a disposal when you retire that simply results in someone else taking over the practice and avoiding run off cover is probably the safest and easiest thing to do.



I’m not always sure that the SAS motto of ‘he/she who dares wins’ always counts when it comes to business, but if you are thinking of selling in the next 10 years it is probably a very good idea to be thinking about whether or not you are the sole asset to your business, or whether there is a way that you can get out of this and set up a structure that you can then sell to someone else when you want to get out.



For further information and advice on buying and selling a law firm, please contact Jonathan Fagan Business Brokers at jonathanfagan.co.uk or by calling 0800 246 5016. We are always happy to have a confidential chat about future plans.


https://www.jonathanfagan.co.uk/law-firm-sales-making-sure-you-are-not-the-asset-for-sale/

Tuesday, November 16, 2021

Legal Recruitment News November 2021

Legal Recruitment Newsletter November 2021 from the Ten Percent Group of websites. Includes our legal job market report, locum solicitor hourly rates, article on high PII affecting the value of law firms, rewards & benefits in the legal sector, bad A levels and a 2.1 law degree - what to do and an interview question & suggested answer.

https://www.ten-percent.co.uk/legal-recruitment-news-november-2021/

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Licensed Conveyancers, Legal Cashiers, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database.

I have bad A levels and just about to get a 2:1 degree. What should I do about it?

 

We have had a careers enquiry in from a third year law student asking us what he should do about his A levels. He has C C D at A level and is currently in his third year at university and expects to graduate with a 2:1 degree. He has been looking at job applications and noticing that a lot of law firms require very high A levels in order to apply. He has asked the question whether he should return to college and complete his A levels again in order to get the grades, or just apply anyway.

Advice

Our advice is to do neither. I think it is simply a case that this particular student needs to accept that because he has not got the A level grades required for specific firms it is unfortunately going to be their loss and his gain if he ends up somewhere else.

This of course does not help the particularly candidate in question, so looking at practicalities we think the best option for him would be to aim simply to qualify as a solicitor, and the route probably available to him is to look at high street law firms, local authorities and NGOs. These very often have more flexibility when it comes to grades and look at other issues rather than just high A level grades in order to determine whether to take someone on a training contract. It is highly possible that this particular student is going to spend a considerable part of his early career in paralegal work (if he can get it) and then use that to move himself into a training contract and later qualification.

We do not think there is any point in applying for firms where there is a minimum requirement at A level because they are going to get so many applications from students who do have the minimum required A levels that it would be a bit of a waste of time filling out the form on the whole. That is assuming there is nothing particularly outstanding that this student has done as well as their A levels, but in most cases this is simply not the case. Similarly going back to college to retake A levels for a year is a bit extreme when the student could be out gaining valuable practical experience and moving their career along that way.

As we say time and time again to both qualified and non-qualified lawyers that in most parts of the profession it is not your qualifications that will get you places, it is your experience. Whilst it is true that there is a higher tier of solicitors who earn huge amounts of money and work very long hours in order to do this, the vast majority earn less than £45,000 and work in smaller practices. They do not generally have particularly outstanding academic achievements or extensive qualifications.

Bear this in mind when applying for jobs. Do not get a chip on your shoulder about the fact that everyone else has better A levels than you and life is unfair, but instead deal with it. You sat the A levels, you got the grades and that is just the way it is.

So in summary, get work experience, concentrate on smaller practices and paralegal work potentially, consider not taking the LPC (or the new equivalent) until you have some work experience so you know that this is the career for you. We hope you enjoy a long and prosperous career in whatever you end up doing!.

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Licensed Conveyancers, Legal Cashiers, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database.

Wednesday, October 20, 2021

Legal Recruitment News October 2021

Legal Recruitment Newsletter October 2021 from the Ten Percent Group of websites. Includes our legal job market report, locum solicitor hourly rates, a long read article on the state of the conveyancing job market, how to explain bad things on a CV and an interview question & suggested answer.  

https://www.interimlawyers.co.uk/legal-recruitment-news-october-2021/

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Licensed Conveyancers, Legal Cashiers, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database.

Conveyancer Recruitment Shortage - the Perfect Storm

 

Conveyancer Shortage - the Perfect Storm (and a lengthy read)

There is a huge shortage in the conveyancing job market at the moment, with a shortfall of conveyancing lawyers in most law firms and increased amounts of work coming in. As I write this article in September 2021 we have already had reports from industry experts that the market would crash or drop after June and the end of the stamp duty holiday, and subsequently that the market would drop or crash at the end of September 2021 at the end of all support to the property market.

What these reports and predictions don’t take into account is that there have been seismic shifts in the numbers of conveyancers either looking for work or currently in roles.

A Brief History According to Ten Percent Legal

In order to explain the conveyancing job market a bit of history is needed. Back in the mid 1990s conveyancing was starting to be seen as the poor cousin to most other areas of law on the high street. The government had removed a whole load of different bits of regulation - solicitors could now advertise for work, they could set prices, drop prices, pay referral fees (to a certain extent) and generally take part in competition to bring down prices of conveyancing. The bottom dropped out of the market and soon pretty much every firm was heading rapidly downhill in the amount of money it could make out of conveyancing. The theory was that if protection for the market was removed, it would increase competition & effiiciency and therefore drive down prices with the work being done at the same level of quality.

What actually happened was that firms started making less money out of conveyancing, mistakes were made, professional indemnity insurance shot up and large operations started to appear to do vast amounts of conveyancing at low prices.

The Big Collapse

Fast forward to 2008 and the bank collapse followed by the property crash put an end to a lot of conveyancing business for quite some time across the UK. We watched as a legal job market driven by the property market and making up a sizeable chunk of our profits drop down to less than about 5% of our turnover and the vast majority of conveyancers either not looking for work under any circumstances because there wasn’t any to be found, and if there was any it would be done on a profit share, or moving out of the profession completely.

It got to the point where we were getting reports from conveyancing lawyers of many years standing that they were now earning more doing their part time jobs on the side to support their families than they were from the actual conveyancing work they were doing as well, whether on a profit share or part time or zero hours contract. We came across conveyancers taking roles as council planning officers and working night shifts in Tesco. Teaching and lecturing roles seemed very popular.

Slow Movement

This market remained in place for about four to five years with very little conveyancing work and recruitment going on. When there was recruitment the salaries were not sufficient to attract anyone back into a role, or to get someone to move from one practice to another. Certain law firms deluded themselves into thinking that there were lots of willing and able conveyancers out there happy to work for less than they would get if they were working as a HGV lorry driver, and this was not necessarily the fault of the law firms, who since the 1990s had seen their own profits plummet from doing conveyancing, and therefore were not in a position to pay very much more.

Also quite a few conveyancing solicitors had discovered locuming work, partly by accident, and did not really want to move back into a salaried permanent role. Locuming for conveyancing took off in about 2014 and has got busier every year since.

The Pandemic

However fast forwarding to the start of the pandemic and the property jobs market was nice and stable, consistent place, with a regular movement of staff from one firm to the next, a reasonable supply of conveyancing lawyers, whether locum or permanent, and a steady supply of work to most firms.

Unfortunately the pandemic then hit in March 2020 and the property market yet again went off a cliff. There was very little conveyancing going on because there were no viewings and no-one was allowed to travel to work. Pretty much everything across the economy stopped, but as usual the property market was excessively affected by all the seismic movements in the economy.

This meant that yet again conveyancers needed to be flexible and start to look at other options, whether within or outside the legal profession, and yet again there was very little work around for anybody who had found themselves out of a job at the start of the pandemic, or in need of locum work to sustain themselves.

Of course this meant that at about this time people were looking at alternative options, and therefore moving away from their traditional work of conveyancing into other things. So when we fast forward to the summer of 2021 and the huge amount of conveyancing going through law firms because of the stamp duty holiday and the sudden build up of savings in the economy, there were not enough conveyancers to do the work.

Conveyancer Shortage and £75k Salaries

Conveyancers who were available to do the work suddenly found themselves in huge demand for other firms who were, due to the amount of work coming through, suddenly able to pay increased amounts of money to attract staff. These increases in money meant that conveyancers were now able to start looking for alternative jobs, and in the same way that some houses across the country started to change hands at ridiculous prices, conveyancing staff found themselves being offered salaries by firms who used to offer £45,000 who are now putting out figures of £75,000 in order to try and get somebody in to cover the work.

Even so, we found that a good number of roles where firms were advertising at very high prices were still not attracting staff in because conveyancers who had been working flat out over the summer dealing with the increased caseload, were getting increasingly fed up of doing more of the same.

External Factors and Stress Levels

The conveyancing process is still incredibly creaky and much, much slower than it could be. From the various searches, title checks, each party arguing and communicating with the other through all sorts of different means without any set procedures, the Land Registry not being sufficiently staffed or automated, title maps not being sufficiently accurate to record ownership in all cases and delays being thrown up at just about every single stage of the whole transaction.

We know ourselves from anecdotal experience that when there is a delay in the sale/purchase of a property all the parties simply blame the solicitors. The solicitors then get contacted constantly by just about everyone even when its nothing to do with them!

All of this makes the experience for most people buying and selling houses much more stressful than it ever needs to be. No-one has ever managed to really get control of this and sort it out so that the whole transaction becomes so much smoother, without any need for lengthy discussions or interventions from different parties.

The reason I’ve included this bit in this article is because the pressure all of this puts on conveyancers for the work they do is tremendous and a lot of them find it to be so stressful they simply don’t want to continue. We get conveyancers contacting us fairly regularly looking for work in anything other than conveyancing and this has been the case now for a good number of years but dramatically increased since the pandemic.

The stamp duty holiday caseload has resulted in a number of conveyancing lawyers deciding they never want to do conveyancing again. Just to add to that is also the issue that quite a good number of conveyancers are older staff who have been doing it for long periods of time, and reaching the end of their career. Newer conveyancing lawyers coming into the market do a couple of years and then decide it’s simply not for them and move on to other things, to have less stress, shorter hours and better pay.

Conveyancing and HGV Drivers

So a little bit like HGV drivers, the market in smaller firms is top heavy with experienced staff who in turn work in their own way that may or may not include maximising the use of technology. This in turn causes issues for firms - we get a number of calls from practice managers who want to book a locum but are most apologetic because Bob Jones the conveyancer has his own way of working and most files are paper based and no remote working is possible (which in turn removes a large number of available locums!).

Locums - a Cog in the Wheel

Conveyancing locums provide short term solutions to increases in work or absence of staff, whether through sickness or annual leave. Unfortunately the recent pandemic has drastically reduced the amount of availability of conveyancing locums because a number of them have taken fairly well paid permanent roles, others are not willing to travel to do conveyancing work, others have become disillusioned at the sheer amount of work that was dumped upon them when the stamp duty holiday came in and simply don’t want to do work for certain firms, and others charge so much that firms cannot afford them. Similarly the market is aging and a number of locums are retiring completely (and others have passed away).

It has gone from a situation where if a conveyancing assignment came in to us we would be 80-90% sure of filling it or providing at least one potential locum to the firm for them to consider. In the summer we found ourselves being able to supply just one CV for every five conveyancing locum assignments that come our way, and even then it’s likely to be someone we either haven’t worked with before or charging serious amounts of money to do a job that would have cost a lot less a few years ago.

So where does this leave the conveyancing market?

If the cost of undertaking the conveyancing is going up then surely it is time to increase the cost per conveyancing transaction in the hope of reducing the work yet maintaining turnover and profit from doing less of it for the same amount of money. Easier said than done of course, and we know as much as anyone else that as soon as you increase your prices you lose business! However the one area we think everyone can improve their staff retention is to reward them in the good times wherever possible.

Allow your staff to benefit

Whilst increasing salaries may not be an option, firms perhaps need to look at their bonus structures and make it easier for staff to benefit from any boom in the conveyancing market, and to avoid the whole saga of conveyancing lawyers looking to move on as soon as the market gets busy because other companies are paying a lot more than yours.

Obviously partners of law firms will say, “Yes but in the quieter times we look after our staff and still pay them, so our staff ought to show us some loyalty when we stick by them in those times when we get to busier times and we take more of the profit”.

I entirely agree with this sentiment but it’s not reality. People who are not being particularly well paid in the first place will always look to move on if somebody comes along waving more money at them for the same work, provided there’s no other issues involved. It’s human nature and I think at times partners of law firms forget that everyone has to pay overheads and bills, and it’s easier said than done to retain staff solely on a loyalty basis.

Going forwards from 2021 it is highly likely that the market will drop down to more quieter levels as all sorts of new crises kick in and the property market quietens down a lot. It is these times when firms have to start thinking about the next boom and how they’re going to deal with it, and perhaps put things in place now that will enable them to survive in the longer term.

This article was first published as part of the Legal Recruitment News in October 2021 - www.legal-recruitment.co.uk

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Licensed Conveyancers, Legal Cashiers, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database.

Saturday, September 18, 2021

Legal Recruitment News September 2021

 Legal Recruitment News from Ten Percent Legal Recruitment. Includes legal job market report, locum hourly rate guide, interview Q&A, law firm sales advice, locuming advice and more. 

https://chancerylane.co.uk/legal-recruitment-news-september-2021/

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Licensed Conveyancers, Legal Cashiers, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database.

Wednesday, July 21, 2021

Legal Recruitment News July 2021

Legal Recruitment News for July 2021 including age discrimination on CVs, selling law firms to non-solicitors, commercial contract manager vs in house legal counsel on job applications, salary reviews and hourly rates plus our legal job market report.  

http://www.legal-recruitment.co.uk/legal-recruitment-news-july-2021/

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Licensed Conveyancers, Legal Cashiers, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database.

Saturday, June 12, 2021

Legal Recruitment News June 2021

 June 2021 edition of Legal Recruitment News. It includes the Ten Percent Legal Recruitment job market report, locum hourly rates, careers advice and suggested interview answers.

 

https://www.ten-percent.co.uk/legal-recruitment-news-june-2021/

 

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Licensed Conveyancers, Legal Cashiers, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database.

Haggling for the sake of it - Recruitment Agency Fees

 

Haggling for the sake of it - what's your best price?

I recently took a call from a senior partner of a small niche commercial practice, who rang me up because he was looking to recruit a number of senior commercial lawyers and wanted our assistance. We spent about 20 minutes on the phone with discussions around his firm, his firm’s aspirations, future plans, recruitment needs and a chat about how we could help. We went through all of this before he asked about fees. I explained to him that our fees were 18% (see our website for a full breakdown).

He informed me that his firm had enjoyed a long lasting relationship with a recruiter who had charged him a lot less and that he was hoping to emulate this with a future deal.

I explained that our fees were usually non-negotiable and that we worked on a set rate for everyone regardless of salary or seniority of the staff being recruited. I also suggested he stuck with the other recruiter as the rate (12%) is very good indeed! For a list of selected legal recruitment agency fees please click here: http://www.lawyer-recruitment.co.uk/legal-recruitment-agency-fees/

Fee Haggling

The senior partner seemed very surprised at this and a bit of email correspondence followed on with the basic premise being that as a recruitment agency we ought to be prepared to haggle on our fees, because this is expected. We politely declined and I referred him to a couple of our competitors who I know charge standard fees higher than ours but also very often are prepared to be haggled downwards to get to more competitive levels.

Over the years I’ve been in business I’ve started to learn, although it has taken me a long time, that if you have a fee that you charge, having carefully worked out the profit margins, costs of running the business etc then that will be the price. We do not negotiate for the sake of it (although we are always very supportive of legal aid firms).

I can see the senior partner’s point in this case because he is calling a recruitment consultant with the intention of offering them a long-lasting relationship in return for a reduced fee, but the reality of specialist legal recruitment is very often smaller sized clients (and most of ours are) will only use us once over a period of time. It is therefore it is unlikely that any reduction in our fee in most cases will benefit us in return for a higher number of vacancies. Particularly at the moment when we have plenty of vacancies in all areas of law but no candidates to fill them because of the effects of the pandemic.

Are Recruiters Like Estate Agents?

I suppose an analogy is where you look to sell a house through an estate agent. If there are 30 estate agents all offering exactly the same service without any difference at all and all with the same access to potential purchasers, then there would be no logic in going for the most expensive estate agent.

The estate agents on the market will be prepared to haggle on their fees because they are desperate or keen to get the business if they can see a benefit of selling the house. However this is rarely the case and there is of course a substantial difference between different estate agents. The estate agents with a national presence and a well established database and strong reputation will be able to command more of a fee than an estate agent just started out.

The same applies in the recruitment world – there are plenty of recruitment agencies out there, most of whom have access to various job boards, but most of whom do not have their own databases of candidates stretching back many years. Of course there are the well established agencies like Michael Page, Badenoch & Clark, the Sellick Partnership and G2 Legal, there are also lots of smaller ones who do not have the established database & reputation and are simply taking vacancies and posting them across job boards to see if they can attract any new applicants.

Database Access

We provide a specific service with access to our database of over 12,000 solicitors who have registered with us over the last 20 years. Whilst we also have access to job boards, including the Law Society Gazette and Reed, we don’t make most of our placements from this. The vast majority of our placements come from our candidate database from lawyers who have been registered with us for a number of years, as well as new candidates finding our websites and registering with us, or looking at specific jobs on our website. The same will apply to those of our competitors who have been around for quite a long time as well.

Bear this in mind when discussing fees with agencies – very often a discussion about fees is probably not the best way to start your relationship with a recruitment consultant, but instead to simply ask them to send you CVs. You may find that the agency who want to offer you a 'too good to be true' deal of 10% fees or similar will be more than happy to do so because they know the chance of actually finding a candidate using their limited database is going to be extremely low.. See what the recruitment agents have for you before you rule any out in terms of price – it doesn’t necessarily mean that a low fee charging recruitment agency is going to do a better job for you than a higher paid one.

 Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Licensed Conveyancers, Legal Cashiers, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database.

Tuesday, May 18, 2021

Charity Donations May 2021 by the Ten Percent Group of Websites

 

The trustees of the Ten Percent Foundation finally met yesterday after a lengthy delay and made the decision to make the following donations:

Cure Parkinsons Trust, London - £500
Reprieve, London - £500
Unlock, London - £500
Stamma, London - £500
Flying High Trampoline Club, Denbigh - £2,000
STAND, North Wales - £1,000
The First Step, Merseyside - £2,500
Argoed Sports Association, Mold - £3,000
Dreams & Wishes, South Wales - £300
Walthamstow Toy Library, London - £300
Mencap Liverpool - £225
Calon Riding for the Disabled, North Wales - £500.

Full article on our donations to follow next month.

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Licensed Conveyancers, Legal Cashiers, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database.

Legal Recruitment News May 2021

Welcome to the May 2021 edition of Legal Recruitment News. It includes our legal job market report, locum hourly rates, careers advice, selling a law firm, working as a locum via PAYE, getting into commercial law after a high street training contract and suggested interview answers.

https://www.jonathanfagan.co.uk/legal-recruitment-news-may-2021/

 

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Licensed Conveyancers, Legal Cashiers, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database.

Saturday, April 10, 2021

Legal Recruitment News April 2021

 Legal Recruitment News from the Ten Percent Group. 

http://www.legal-recruitment.co.uk/legal-recruitment-news-april-2021/

Legal Recruitment News April 2021 from Ten Percent Group of websites including the Legal Job Market Update, locum solicitor hourly rates, articles on booking locums for more than one field of law, interview practice questions, law firm valuations, IR35 and more.

 Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Licensed Conveyancers, Legal Cashiers, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database.

Thursday, March 11, 2021

Legal Recruitment News March 2021

 https://www.ten-percent.co.uk/legal-recruitment-news-march-2021/

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Licensed Conveyancers, Legal Cashiers, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database.

IR35 - Something to Worry About?

 

No, if you are a small business hiring locums - see the definition below. Please note that this article is not intended as tax or legal advice to be relied on - simply our thoughts.

IR35, for those not in the industry, is a tax rule related to 'off-payroll working' and is all about levelling up tax contributions so that self-employed workers in theory pay the same as employed workers. It is therefore relevant to locums working in law firms and in house legal departments.

A change is coming in from April 2021 - from the 6th April the clients/fee payers will be responsible for managing IR35.

Firms will be required to state whether a role is 'outside of IR35', which will mean that the assignment in their opinion falls into the definition of self-employed work and will be paid gross/in full, or 'inside IR35', which means that it is caught by the legislation and hence net of tax and national insurance.

If a role is 'inside IR35' then it means that the hirer has decided that the worker is not truly self-employed and therefore will have to have NI and PAYE tax deducted from any payments made.

The rule has been applied to the public sector for some time and has caused a few nightmares for contractors, pushed up prices and made it harder to find temporary workers willing to shoulder the extra tax burdens that are passed onto them as a result of the legislation. This is particularly the case where hirers have applied IR35 rules on a blanket basis, mainly to avoid any future issues with HMRC and pass the burden of any unpaid tax onto the introducing agency or the contractor.

However... the main point if anyone talks about IR35 (and we are hearing the term used a lot by some locums!) is that it does not apply to smaller sized companies and hence does not become an issue.

A company is classed as a small company if it meets two of the following three conditions:

An annual turnover of less than £10.2 million, a balance sheet total of less than £5.1 million and fewer than 50 employees.

This applies to most law firms in most sectors and hence the IR35 rules will not usually apply. In these cases the contractor remains responsible for determining their own tax position.

Blanket Assessments

We have come across local authorities and larger companies who will simply state that all their assignments are going to be inside IR35, regardless of actual status of the contractors in question. This has caused issues. The REC (the recruitment industry trade body) has produced the following list of reasons why this is a very bad idea. I am not sure some of them are particularly good arguments, but here it is..

The regulations require you to assess contractors on a case-by-case basis. So, if you’re assessing everyone the same without looking at people as individuals and how they provide their service, that’s not right.

Contractor relations affected. Contractors are rightly concerned about their tax liabilities if you’re just making a blanket decision without considering what they actually do, or have done in the past. For example, contractors who have worked without supervision and have autonomy being classified as same as those who have worked under the direct supervision of the client. It would be understandable for contractors to feel undervalued and at risk.

Future litigation. Contractors will be able to take clients and agencies to court to claim back costs of wrongly working inside IR35. So not looking at contractors individually could have a big financial consequence later on.

Complex supply chain. If you’re forcing your contractors to go PAYE, they may go through different routes to achieve that – direct employment or using a so-called umbrella company or even a sole trader. That will make your supply chain more complex and compliance more difficult to establish.

Additional benefits. There are regulatory changes that come with moving people to PAYE as they will have more legal entitlements. For example, you’ll need to think through the Agency Workers Regulations and treating staff equally with your own employees on pay, hours and holidays.

The CEO of the REC finished his article with the following quote:

"There’s a moral to this story. Just because the government hasn’t thought through IR35 properly doesn’t mean you should follow their example."

Here's hoping that the legislation never applies to smaller businesses!

Links:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/private-sector-off-payroll-working-for-clients
https://www.rec.uk.com/recruiters/legal/ir35
https://www.paystream.co.uk/helphub/ir35/articles/ir35-mythbuster-3-the-small-company-exemption/

 

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Licensed Conveyancers, Legal Cashiers, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database.

Wednesday, March 10, 2021

Podcast Talk by Jonathan Fagan - High Street vs Commercial, Nepotism in Law, Criminal Law - Avoid like the plague?, Problems getting Training Contracts

Jonathan Fagan, MD of Ten Percent Legal Recruitment, gave a talk to the 93 Percent Club in Guildford on Monday 8th March 2021. In case you missed it - here is a full recording. 

 https://anchor.fm/jonathan-fagan/episodes/Jonathan-Fagan-Talk-to-the-Guildford-93PercentClub-es6634

Legal Career Advice from Ten Percent Recruitment Agency London:

 Event Details:

·         Speaker – Jonathan Fagan – Director at Ten Percent Legal.

·         Date – 8th of March 2021 at 6pm.

·         Platform for Event – Zoom.

About the Recruitment Agency:

·         Small, specialist online Legal Recruitment consultancy, established in April 2000 by two of the current directors – Jonathan and Claire Fagan.

·         Over 10,000 solicitors registered with the agency and work with hundreds of law firms across the UK.

·         If you want any more advice or information with legal issues not discussed at the event can follow this link to their page https://www.ten-percent.co.uk/articles/     

 

Introduction to Jonathan:

·         From a state school background and is a non-practising solicitor.

 

Topics Discussed:

·         Problems getting training contracts – 2:2 degrees, poor A levels, no work experience of overseas qualifications.

·         High Street v Commercial Law – what is the difference?

·         Is there nepotism in the legal profession and how can I use my own connections?

·         The lowdown on criminal law – avoid like the plague?

 

Structure of the Event:

·         18:00 – Start.

·         18:00-18:10 – Jonathan’s introduction and his route into law.

·         18:10-18:25 – Problems getting training contracts -2:2 degrees, poor A levels, no work experience, or overseas qualifications.

·         18:25-18:40 – High Street v Commercial Law – what is the difference?

·         18:40-18:55 – Is there nepotism in the legal profession and how can I use my own connections?

·         18:55-19:10 – The lowdown on criminal law – avoid like the plague?

·         19:10-19:30 – Short Q and A Session.

·         19:30 – End of the Event.

 

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Licensed Conveyancers, Legal Cashiers, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database.

Monday, February 08, 2021

Legal Recruitment News February 2021

Click the link below for the Legal Recruitment News - our monthly newsletter (now 13 years old!) from the Ten Percent Group of recruitment websites. 

https://www.ten-percent.co.uk/legal-recruitment-news-february-2021/

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database. Our Legal Careers Shop has eBooks on CV Writing for Lawyers, Legal Job Interview Guide, Interview Answers for Lawyers, NQ Career Guide, Guide to Finding Work Experience or a Training Contract and the Entrants Guide to the Legal Profession.

Charity Donations 2021 - Suggestions Welcome

Our charity bank account currently has over £24,000 in it, which means that it is that time in the year again when the trustees of the Ten Percent Foundation meet to discuss our donation of 10% of the annual profits of the Ten Percent Group of websites, which include Ten Percent Legal, Ten Percent Financial, Jonathan Fagan Law Firm Sales, TP Transcription and Chancery Lane.

We avoid charities with top heavy staffing & admin costs and welcome any suggestions from clients, candidates and general readers of our newsletters. We particularly like small charities with limited funds. Examples of donations made over the past 20 years can be found on our website at [www.tenpercentfoundation.org](http://www.tenpercentfoundation.org). To suggest a charity please email Jonathan Fagan at cv@ten-percent.co.uk. We consider all requests very carefully. 

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals.

Friday, January 15, 2021

Legal Recruitment News January 2021

Legal Recruitment News includes a legal job market report, hourly rates guide for locums, a state of the market report for the sale of law firms and articles on job interviews, buying a law firm for nothing and interview techniques. January 2021 edition. 

Click the link below to read: 

https://www.jonathanfagan.co.uk/legal-recruitment-news-january-2021/

 

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database. Our Legal Careers Shop has eBooks on CV Writing for Lawyers, Legal Job Interview Guide, Interview Answers for Lawyers, NQ Career Guide, Guide to Finding Work Experience or a Training Contract and the Entrants Guide to the Legal Profession.

Annual Predictions from a Psychic for 2020 - how well did he do?

 

Annual Predictions - how did the professional psychic do?

We have been following the predictions of Craig Hamilton-Parker of psychics.co.uk for some years now - it is fascinating to see how he fares every year with his previous year's predictions.

Here are a selection of his predictions for 2020 taken from his website at the start of the year:
War in the Middle East - hmm - sort of correct (but then there is always a war occurring in the Middle East - its a bit like predicting that it will rain in Wales).
Trump Reelected - incorrect
Boris Marries Carrie Symonds - incorrect
Meghan Markle Pregnancy - sort of correct!
Revolution in China - incorrect
European Economic Crisis - incorrect
Yvette Cooper becomes the leader of the Labour Party. - incorrect
Prince Charles will be hit by an egg. - incorrect (unless Camilla threw one at him and nobody knows).
Elizabeth Warren will be the Democrat Presidential Contender - incorrect.

Total score - 1/2 out of 9. Megan was pregnant for a while and there is a war in the Middle East. However it does like the cosmic rays were not fully functioning in 2020!

Selection of Predictions for 2021 Taken From https://psychics.co.uk/blog/predictions/

There will be a tsunami near Japan.
Giant iceberg causes shipping problems.
There will be strikes and protests in the USA, the UK and Europe. Very violent protests occur in Paris, London and Washington.
North Korea will fire more missiles. There will be starvation in North Korea and moves to remove Kim Jong-un by his own people.
New infrastructure projects will be announced including plans to build a tunnel to Northern Ireland.
Southern Ireland will struggle with Brexit and in the years to come will leave the EU.
There will be a public backlash against the BBC’s overt political correctness.
Terrorists hijack a plane. I see Paris. Gunfight in an airport.
Joe Biden will have a short presidency. An illness or accident will stop his presidency short. Biden will be succeeded by a woman.
A serious Trump illness during 2021 is predicted and marital problems ahead. Possible affair revealed. Trump will stand as an independent candidate in 2024. The Republican party will betray him. It’s too soon to say if he will win in 2024. (unless he does the remedies) An earlier election may be called.

We will revisit in January 2021 with a score! Incidentally psychics are available now to speak to at £1.50 per minute on the website above (although there is currently a special offer of 29p per minute for 10 minutes for new customers).

 

Jonathan Fagan is Managing Director of Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment and a non-practising Solicitor. Ten-Percent Legal Recruitment provides online Legal Recruitment for Solicitors, Legal Executives, Fee Earners, Support Staff, Managers and Paralegals. Visit our Website to search our Vacancy Database. Our Legal Careers Shop has eBooks on CV Writing for Lawyers, Legal Job Interview Guide, Interview Answers for Lawyers, NQ Career Guide, Guide to Finding Work Experience or a Training Contract and the Entrants Guide to the Legal Profession.